Video: Rainy season (monsoon) in Chiang mai

The rainy season in Chiang Mai is fascinating and lasts from around June to about October. As opposed to most guidebooks I actually recommend people visit the city during this time of the year. There are several reasons for this: a) the rainy season doesn’t mean that it rains day and night, far from the truth. It may rain for one hour in the late afternoon and then not rain for the next 5 days or rain all night (when good children are asleep 🙂 ), b) Everything becomes green and the air is fresh after the little rain has gone. This time is beautiful, with many wild flowers around, and it is nice for trekking or visiting the mountains which is one of the main reasons people come to Chiang Mai, c) There is a very low level of pollution as opposed to the end of the cold season (from February to April) in which the levels of pollution becomes a hazard to health. During the rainy season the air is fresh in the morning, and the daytime is not too hot, d) The accommodation in the city is much cheaper than in the high season (from November until January).

All of this being said, I will have to warm you about the amounts of rain that comes down when it does rain. Within a matter of minutes it can change (and usually does) from a few drops to a torrential downpour which often leaves the streets flooded. The rain is usually heaviest in September, with an average precipitation of 250mm for that month. Another downside to the rainy season is the amount of mosquitoes in the beginning (May – June) – do put lots of mosquito repellent on.

The "rainy season" video below was taken on September 16th and shows you how much rain comes down at one time – enjoy 🙂

Video: Wat Umong (the forest temple), Chiang Mai

This video shows you the amazing Wat Umong temple in Chiang Mai.

Scenery: Peaceful land with lots of trees and shade on a hot day. You can feed the fish, turtles, and ducks in a large pond. The Wat is famous for its ancient tunnels and large stupa. Other attractions include a Buddha field of broken sculptures, a fasting Bodhisattva, a spiritual theatre of paintings, reproductions of ancient Buddhist sculptures from India, and a library-museum.

History: The monastery at Wat Umong is one of the oldest in Chiang Mai, dating back to 1300 A.D. The fable goes that a king built the brick-lined tunnels for an eccentric monk named Thera Jan. Once upon a time there were paintings decorated on the wall which dated back to about 1380. You can enter the tunnels to see the small shrines inside (a flashlight is useful). The adjoining stupa was constructed about 1520 over an earlier stupa (1400-1550). The monastery was eventually abandoned, though Japanese troops were said to have a stronghold here during World War 2. Since 1948, the Thai prince Jao Chun Sirorot has been active in rebuilding and reestablishing the monastery. In 1949 he invited Buddhadasa Bhikkhu (founder of Suan Mokkh in southern Thailand) to come and live in the monastery. Obligations kept Buddhadasa Bhikkhu from coming and instead he sent Ajahn Pannananda and other monks to help set up and run Wat Umong.

Tunnels at Wat Umong, Chiang Mai

Getting there: Wat Umong is located 3.5 km west of Chiang Mai. From Suandok Gate (the West gate of the old city) you drive up Suthep road (approximately 2, 5 km West) and cross Canal road. About half a kilometer after Canal road, there is a sign on your left hand side which leads you to Wat Umong. From here follow the signs south 1 km to the Wat. The easiest way is by tuk-tuk, scooter or bicycle.

Here’s a map


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Video: Spending a day on the beach in Denmark

Today was an amazing day in Copenhagen. The sky and sea were blue, the people smiling and the weather hot…32 degrees! I spent the day on the beach with my wonderful sister Gitte and thousands of other Danish people who had gotten the same idea.

This video was filmed on Amager strand (Amager beach) in Copenhagen and it shows you Sweden in the background and lovely Danish beach life.

Enjoy…we did 🙂

Video: Khaosan road in Bangkok, Thailand

This video shows Khaosan Road in Bangkok.

Khaosan road is what you can call a traveller’s mecca. Some people hate it and some people love it. It is located in the old part of Bangkok in an area called Banglampu. It is well connected to major attractions in Bangkok by bus number 2, 15, 47, 73, and 511 just to mention a few. Bus no. 53 goes to the main train station.

I always stay around Khaosan Road when I visit Bangkok and have previous lived in the area for 4 months. I love the buzzing atmosphere – you can find absolutely everything here: restaurants, cheap guesthouses, old and new friends, clothes and handicraft shops, massage places, tattoo artists, internet shops, travel agencies (it is cheaper to by bus tickets from here than from the government run offices at bus stations) and places to have a fun night out.

It is a very vibrant place and a crossroad for travellers from all over Asia. I highly recommend you to stop over in Bangkok when you are in Thailand. This city has a lot to offer. Enjoy

Video: New Years Eve party, Hadrin Beach, Koh Phangan, Thailand

I just thought I’d post this video to show the mayhem that Tina and I experienced on Hadrin beach, Koh Phangan for New Year 2006/2007. Four days later, on the 4th January, it was followed by a full moon party. Haad Rin on Koh Phangan is not for the faint-hearted generally, but as the video shows, at this time of year it goes absolutely mental. If you’re not into partying – go somewhere else 😉