Fashion – but at what price? Your shoes are a dead animal!


If you are an animal lover (of just a person with a conscience) you should seriously consider not wearing leather shoes (and bags, jackets etc.).

Animal organisations worldwide such as Peta have documented horrible conditions for cows, pigs, goats, and sheep—and even dogs and cats—in the leather industry. Animals are condemned to deplorable living conditions, deprived of food and water, transported in small cages, and crammed onto trucks. At slaughterhouses, they watch as other animals are skinned—often while still alive—and await the same gruesome fate.

Most leather is produced in developing countries where there are no effective animal protection laws whatsoever. Six years after a Peta investigation into the Indian leather industry prompted the Indian government to promise to improve conditions for animals killed for their skin, many major retailers to turn away from Indian leather—yet so very much suffering still occurs. Animals are still grotesquely abused in ways that violate Indian law and all standards of dignity and humanity. You should not let this continue.

Peta’s investigators have seen cows have their throats cut with blunt instruments and be painfully castrated, dehorned, and branded—all without painkillers of any kind. At the end of their miserable lives, these gentle animals are hung upside-down, bled to death, skinned, and dismembered—for example, their hooves are cut off—often while they are still conscious.

But you can take important steps today to reduce this suffering. To start with, please stop buying or wearing leather products. Believe me, there are great alternatives available. Honestly, I think walking around in the skin of a dead animal is outrageous. Have a conscience – stop buying leather!

Copenhagen stops supporting counseling for HIV-infected in 2011

Currently the 18th International AIDS Conference is taking place in Vienna. The conference was opened by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon who praised the progress made in the fight against the disease.

He stressed, however, that it remains important to continue the fight and prioritize efforts. If the international community chooses to spend less money on the fight against AIDS, there is “a risk that we have reversed the progress of a recession,” said Ban Ki-moon as a comment to that one result of the global financial crisis is that some governments now choose to spend less money on the fight against AIDS than ever before.

But you don’t have to look out into the world to see that there is less money spent on combating the spread of HIV and AIDS. We can just look at Denmark and the capital Copenhagen which has already budgeted less money in this area.

Copenhagen Municipality health and care Committee has decided to entirely abandon the continued support for counseling for HIV-infected and their families (400,000 DKK in 2010) from 2011 – an advisory work performed HIV-Denmark.

This decision is completely counteracting a study from 2009 which shows that Denmark and Copenhagen in particular has had particular success in preventing a massive increase in the number of newly infected due to the personal counseling of the people potentially infected with HIV.

However, it is said that the politicians in Copenhagen in 2011 will continue to support distribution of free condoms. But seriously, I work within the field of HIV/AIDS and I have never noticed free distribution of condoms in Copenhagen and even if they exists it is the personal counseling of HIV that causes us/reminds us to use a condom.

I urge the politicians in Copenhagen to eradicate its decision on HIV-Danmark’s 2011 counseling work. The health of our people is a stake. Do you care?

HIV and AIDS in numbers

In 2008 two million people died worldwide of AIDS. It’s more than 166,000 men, women and children a month. Or 5479 deaths every day.

The UN estimates that 2.7 million people became infected with HIV in 2008. This corresponds to 225,000 every month – or nearly 7,400 new infections every day or just over five every minute.

Worldwide 33.4 million people are infected with HIV. That’s why I still work in this field!

Video: Yoga teacher training course at Yoga Inbound in Cuzco, Peru

This video gives you an idea about the yoga teacher training course I did with Chaitanya Nitai Das at Yoga Inbound in Cuzco. I really loved the training and can truly say that yoga has had a life changing effect on me.

In this video you will see parts of the lessons – yoga philosophy and training and Chaitanya will tell you about his training and the idea behind Yoga Inbound and finally I will tell you why I enjoyed it so much.

For more information about Yoga Inbound in Cuzco – please visit the website: http://yogacusco.com/

Slow dance

This poem was written by a terminally ill young girl in a New York Hospital. I love it because it reminds us that time is really short and we need to enjoy every single moment of every single little thing. Life is beautiful.

SLOW DANCE

Have you ever watched kids
On a merry-go-round?

Or listened to the rain
Slapping on the ground?

Ever followed a butterfly’s erratic flight?
Or gazed at the sun into the fading night?

You’d better slow down.
Don’t dance so fast.

Time is short.
The music won’t last.

Do you run through each day
On the fly?

When you ask “How are you?”
Do you hear the reply?

When the day is done
Do you lie in your bed

With the next hundred chores
Running through your head?

You’d better slow down
Don’t dance so fast.

Time is short.
The music won’t last.

Ever told your child,
We’ll do it tomorrow?

And in your haste,
Not see his sorrow?

Ever lost touch,
Let a good friendship die

Cause you never had time
To call and say “Hi”?

You’d better slow down.
Don’t dance so fast.

Time is short.
The music won’t last.

When you run so fast to get somewhere
You miss half the fun of getting there.

When you worry and hurry through your day,
It is like an unopened gift….

Thrown away.
Life is not a race.

Do take it slower
Hear the music

Before the song is over.

Video: Kanyakumari (Cape Comorin) – the land’s end of India

Kanyakumari is the ‘Land’s End’ of the Indian subcontinent, where the Bay of Bengal meets the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea. It is the place to experience simultaneous sunset and moonrise over the ocean.

Kanyakumari has great spiritual significance for Hindus, and is dedicated to the goddess Devi Kanya, an incarnation of Parvati. Pilgrims come here to visit the temple. Kanyakumari is worth a visit 2 days/1 night.

In this video I have filmed Kanyakumari and the temple on my arrival day. Next morning we got up at 5 o’clock to watch the sunrise while the moon was still in the sky. It was very special.

Quinta da Regaleira in Sintra, Portugal

Quinta da Regaleira is a fairytale house in a fairytale landscape and well worth a visit.

The house and the garden is one of the most enigmatic monuments of the cultural landscape of Sintra. The present-day form was built between 1898 and 1912 under the supervision of Carvalho Monteiro. The style is neo-manuelin and the decorative theme involved some of Portugal’s best artists: Antonio Goncalves, Joao Machado, Jose da Fonseca, Costa Motta and Rodrigo de Castro, as sculptors in stone and Julio da Fonseca, in wood.

The garden, as an image of the Cosmos, is revealed through a succession of magic and mysterious places. You will find abundant references to the world of mythology, to Olympus, Virgil, Dante, Milton and Camoes, and to the mission of the Templars as continued by the Order of Christ, to great mystics and miraculous magicians, and to the enigmas of the alchemical Ars Magna.

The house is a magic castle with fairytale carvings of all sorts. Plan to spend at least three hours exploring the place.

Good luck.